An Unsettled Grave

I’ve read a lot of page-turners lately, but this is, by far, the best. I read An Unsettled Grave at the request of the author, Bernard Schaffer. As the second book in the Santero and Rein Series, the story is told in flashbacks, and explores PTSD and drug use among veterans, alcoholism, child abuse and neglect, and teenage bullies. It’s a who-done-it with characters who seem to step right off the page. The author’s background as a police detective lends unique authenticity to the story.

First there is Carrie Santero, a new county detective. Then there are her boss, Chief of county detectives, Harv Bender, her friend, Jacob Rein, and small town police chief, Steve Auburn. Only Jacob respects her position.

When hunters find a small human foot, Carrie is pulled off a rape case and is sent out to the boonies to investigate a cold case. Chief Bender doesn’t believe a newbie should be on the rape case where the violent rapist is reported to be a police officer. She proves herself by solving both cases.

Schaffer has woven into the story the usual things said about professional women – that she was promoted because she was sleeping with her boss. Through Carrie’s eyes, he examines two types of policemen:  those who get to know the people in the community and help out where needed, and those who do little else but cherry-pick drunk drivers to make multiple DUI arrests for award plaques and free dinners from MADD.

Some beautiful reminders for all of us were woven into this story. For example, “The worst sin in this whole world is having a talent and not using it, especially if it’s something the rest of us need.” There is also some good trivia included. For example, the fact that the first motorcycle clubs were founded by World War II fighter pilot veterans.

An Unsettled Grave works well as a stand-alone book, yet it reveals Jacob’s background without re-telling the first story. It was so fast-paced and so compelling, I will have to make time to read the first book in the series, The Thief of all Light, as well as the third book which has not yet been published.

What makes The Grumpy Book Reviewer grumpy?  Oh, just the usual things. You know, split infinitives, a few typos, typos — things easily could have been caused by that evil spell correction that’s on all our computers. Still, a good proofreader/editor should have caught them. 


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